Saturday, September 12, 2020

More Robin Hood Designs by Milt Kahl

These Kahl drawings represent Robin Hood's earlier version based on Ken Anderson sketches.
Robin looks like a mischievous character actor, not the leading man type he turned out to be in the final version of the film. This is a more juvenile appearance with a skinny neck.
My guess is that Milt made these drawings to aid John Lounsbery, who originally was assigned to the lead fox character. 
Fantastic sketches as usual by the one and only Milt Kahl.
A few of these drawings have been posted here before, but these images are scans from originals, not xeroxes.

 






I have posted numerous Robin Hood visuals over the years. My favorite post remains this bizarre interview with Milt when he was promoting Robin Hood in Dallas:

https://andreasdeja.blogspot.com/2012/11/milt-kahl-talks-robin-hood.html


Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Crazy Pelican Postman



I animated this scene from Who Framed Roger Rabbit about a hundred years ago.
These frames are from the start of the scene, which went on and on as the camera pans screen right to reveal life on a film studio's backlot.
This was the cartooniest animation I had done up to this point. I remember animating the brooms from Fantasia using live actin brooms sweeping the floor. All on ones. 
The brooms were also hopping along to the beat of The Sorcerer's Apprentice.

A ton of work, I had no weekends working on this film. No regrets. It was all worth it!


Thursday, August 20, 2020

Dumbo Story Sketch



What an extraordinary story sketch by Bill Peet. 
The circus ringmaster confronts Mrs. Jumbo, who is protecting her baby son. Every character showing distinctively different emotions. This reminds me of what Frank Thomas once said:
"If you have characters in a scene who all think alike, you have a problem."

I also love the crowd's shadows on the ground. Bill Peet is the man!!

More of his story sketches here:
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/--qT-l6QKFSk/VuY5HmSgK1I/AAAAAAAAQgk/75wXVMxwOms4gesQxUF8S5xIm-5YrXNhg/s1600/DB1.jpg


Thursday, August 13, 2020

MUSHKA Seq 14, Sc 60




Here is a frame from the final version of a scene I was animating just recently. 
At the start we watch only Sarah as she pushes the tiger's front part. Then Alex comes in, he pushes the tiger's back end. Obviously each push is separate from the other in terms of timing, so the kids don't end up pushing simultaneously. A little tricky to work out against the tiger's body, but the scene turned out ok.
Regarding effects animation for snow foot prints, I originally had planned for a more icy surface with no foot prints. But we ended up doing the opposite instead. Every step in the snow will have contact animation. And there are quite a few sequences in the snow.

Here is the link to a recent post about roughing out this scene:


Friday, August 7, 2020

Howard Ashman

 

Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Liu Jiyou Zodiac Signs 1981




Toward the end of his life Liu Jiyou painted these small size images of the twelve Chinese Zodiac signs. What a beautiful collage of different animals.

And as a bonus here are a couple of gorgeous illustrations of an eagle.








Sunday, July 26, 2020

From Bill Peet to Ollie Johnston




Another great example of how animators translate a story sketch into the staging for their scene.
This beautiful story sketch is of course by Bill Peet, who's drawings always stimulated the animators' imagination. There are whole sequences in 101 Dalmatians and The Sword in the Stone that maintained Peet's story continuity and staging. Virtually no changes from story sketch to final film frame.
In this scene Merlin is pouring some tea for Wart who just "dropped in". Ollie loosened up Wart's pose a little. Holding his arms behind his back probably didn't feel natural to him. 
As the table grew larger in the final layout there was a chance for Merlin to lean forward into a different pose. All this is called plussing. 
You evaluate what a story artist and a layout man came up with, and you add your own vision to the scene. 
This type of teamwork was essential to achieve top quality in Disney's classics. It was also essential for the films I worked on like Mermaid, Beauty & the Beast, The Lion King and all the others.